Gigabyte P55-USB3 motherboard with 2000 MHz RAM

Just plugged 8GB of G.Skill 2133 mhz ram into my desktop.  The memory clock speed stayed at 1333 mhz when I did so which led to some fiddling with bios settings.

I have a Gigabyte P55-USB3 motherboard with an i5 2.8 Ghz processor and plugged in 2 x 4GB modules of the F3-17000CL11D Ripjaws ram from G.Skill (in a nice red color to boot).  Motherboard manual is here, http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3440#manual

Once in the bios config in the ‘MB Intelligent Tweaker’, the ‘Advanced Memory Settings’ seemed to have what I needed, ‘Extreme Memory Profiles’ for different speeds.   Profile 2 put the speed at 2130 mhz and all the advanced timing settings matched the memory specs (11-11-11-30 2N).  Unfortunately, it wouldn’t boot.  Switching between the different  profiles (disabled, profile 1, profile 2) and ‘Performance Enhance’ modes (standard, turbo, extreme) didn’t help much, the only way  I could boot was at 1600 Mhz in the disabled profile with extreme performance enhance.

Fortunately I hit on a nice overclocking guide, http://www.overclockers.com/3-step-guide-overclock-core-i3-i5-i7/

Leaving the memory settings at the default values, I  went into the ‘Advanced Frequency Settings’ section and changed the Base Clock BCLK to 200Mz with  the CPU Clock Ratio at 16x.  This gave me an overclocked CPU speed of 3.2 Ghz (seemed reasonable and a nice bonus) and put the Memory Frequency at 2000 MHZ (good enough).

After a few hours of serious programming work, the system has been completely stable and seems a bit faster.  Hope that helps.

Running your Government

In the absence of InnoVoter / StickyVote, you may be wondering, “how can I best manage my Government?”  I’m happy to report that this area is still a hotbed of startup activity.  Although several contemporary projects have shut down, some have morphed and new ones have started.

One of the new, Votizen.com, raised $1.5 million just over a year ago and has quite the who’s who of advisers and investors.  Interestingly they have chosen to focus on voter registration records; one of the big early decisions I made was just to prototype that piece and to leave full implementation for later.  Before too long we should see whether that will form a strong foundation for Votizen to build on or a crushing weight of software and data maintenance.

Next on the list is PopVox.com, co-founded by the guy behind govtrack.us, which is still a great source of Federal legislative data.  To communicate with Congress this is the best tool I’ve seen, they have great widgets and do a good job of grouping similar bills together.  The one other I recommend is OpenCongress.org, a non-profit with a strong community of users commenting on bills as well as any easy place to find general information on Congress.

Closing Down – Thanks

Long ago in 2007, I started a company.  It was more of a wild idea than most as it was going to not only make myself and many others rich but also change how politics work in America. Simple mom n’ pop sort of business.  Along with a few other crazy folks and with lots of help we launched stickyvote.com and part-time for two years tried to figure out how it should all work. Politicians, citizens, interest groups; making money, raising money; building software.  It was a fairly good idea but I didn’t figure it all out.

Now that it’s been a few years it’s time to write down the lessons learned that were the main yield of the company.  Perhaps they’ll save someone else some heartburn, and most importantly keep me from making the same mistakes next time.

But first, thanks to everyone who helped.  Thank you for your support, whether that was business advice, political advice, coming to early hacking sessions, being interviewed, donating through paypal or using the alpha product.  Thanks especially to those who put in cold hard cash and to the awesome employees and contractors who sweated away on the product.

Where are these rock stars now you may ask?
Georgia Lindsay, VP, her forthcoming PhD will change the way we relate to buildings.
Jeff Hull, Biz Dev, tells power plants how to run their software.
Luke Hamilton,  programmer, writes powerful Android apps (don’t push that button).
And Parwaiz Yahya, early investor, is taking over the retail world with me at skuloop.com

Thanks most of all to my wonderful wife Erica for all the encouragement and putting up with all the craziness.  Especially the next project…

SOTU 2012

After putting the kid to bed I caught the latter part of the State of the Union.  Good combative speech, I generally liked it.  I would have enjoyed more humility in the mention of our partnerships with other countries, we’re not actually in charge of the world it turns out.  But I do enjoy a feisty speech.

And the Republican response?  I liked the theme, a loyal opposition is critical and Mitch Daniels started off well.  However, “As a loyal opposition, who put patriotism and national success ahead of party or ideology or any self-interest.”  Oh, is that what threatening default on the debt was, causing economic uncertainty for months, the national interest?  Sorry Mitch, had to laugh you off the stage at that point.

Managing Software Projects

With software “eating the world” more and more people find themselves managing software projects.  While many people have experience programming and others have experience managing teams, software engineering has its own set of challenges.  Creating software that solves a problem, is easy to use, doesn’t break all the time, doesn’t die under load, is easily changed and adapted, that new programmers can learn quickly and for a reasonable price… is hard.  In this blog series I’ll cover the forces that drive software and what you can do to keep your project in the fast lane instead of  broken down on the side of the road.

The general outline.